Aaf Football

Aaf Football Die wichtigsten Unterschiede zur NFL

Die Alliance of American Football war eine aus acht Mannschaften bestehende US-amerikanische Profiliga im American Football, die von Charlie Ebersol und Bill Polian gegründet wurde. Der Spielbetrieb begann am 9. Februar , eine Woche nach dem. Die Alliance of American Football (AAF) war eine aus acht Mannschaften bestehende US-amerikanische Profiliga im American Football, die von Charlie Ebersol. Die NFL-Saison ist vorbei und der Sommer steht an. Grund genug für eine neue Football-Liga. Die "Alliance of American Football", kurz "AAF", geht von Anfang. Und genau das will Tom Dundon, Investor und Vorsitzender der Alliance of American Football, ganz offensichtlich: die AAF so schnell wie. AAF stellt seinen Betrieb ein. Stecker gezogen: The Alliance Of American Football ist nach acht Wochen schon wieder Geschichte. 2. April

Aaf Football

Die Alliance of American Football dürfte kurz vor dem Ende stehen. Wie Mike Florio von ProFootballTalk berichtet, hat die Liga am Dienstag. American Football Infos aktuell - AAF: Blauäugige Planung führte zum Aus - Kanada: CFL-Test in Frankfurt - Nordamerika: Arena Football League pleite - Asien. AAF stellt seinen Betrieb ein. Stecker gezogen: The Alliance Of American Football ist nach acht Wochen schon wieder Geschichte. 2. April Weeks 2, 4, 6, and 9 were scheduled with out-of-conference games. Hugh Thornton. Litigation loomed: A venture capitalist, Robert Vanech, had sued the AAF and Ebersol, claiming that Ebersol stole his idea for the league, which Ebersol vehemently denied. Retrieved September 2, Follow the start of the Alliance of American Football and click financial timeline of all the missteps along the way that led to its collapse. Retrieved April 7,

Aaf Football - Liga stellt Spielbetrieb ein

Diese Verhandlungen waren dabei frühzeitig geführt worden. Ihr Passwort. Nachdem bereits am 2. Februar begann die Saison. Sie hätte zehn Wochen laufen sollen, in denen insgesamt vierzig Spiele gespielt werden sollten. FootballR Eigentümer. Jeder Spieler, der sich vor oder während des Snaps in diesem Bereich an der Line of Scrimmage aufgestellt hat, wurde automatisch zu diesen fünf Personen gezählt, unabhängig, ob er tatsächlich rusht oder nicht. XFL · Indoor Football · Kanada · USA · Nationalteam · Ex-Ligen · AAF · Spielplan AAF · 5-Jahres-Bilanz AAF · League Map AAF · UFL · Ex-Teams · Argentinien. American Football Infos aktuell - AAF: Blauäugige Planung führte zum Aus - Kanada: CFL-Test in Frankfurt - Nordamerika: Arena Football League pleite - Asien. Die Alliance of American Football dürfte kurz vor dem Ende stehen. Wie Mike Florio von ProFootballTalk berichtet, hat die Liga am Dienstag. AAF | Zusammenfassung | San Antonio Commanders vs Birmingham Iron | Alliance Es ist zwar nicht ganz die NFL und es ist auch nicht ganz College Football. American Football USA. AAF. ZusammenfassungErgebnisseBegegnungen​TabelleArchiv. USAAAF. 8. Spieltag. San Antonio Commanders. Arizona.

Aaf Football Video

Two weeks later, on March 20, Ebersol and Polian stood onstage and announced the Alliance of American Football, promising to change not only football but the way fans view and bet on the game, with an app that would be ahead of the television feed, allowing fans to gamble before each play.

The first game would be on CBS on Feb. The AAF wasn't a fanciful notion anymore. It was real. They met at their usual spot: the DoubleTree hotel, near the network's sprawling headquarters.

The league was behind schedule, with oversights at almost every turn. The Orlando Apollos would be forced to practice for 36 days in Georgia, qualifying players for workers' compensation benefits there because the AAF had been unable to secure leaguewide insurance for players.

The Salt Lake Stallions would move into their offices only after executives briefly worked out of a McDonald's and the conference room of the team's ticket broker.

Team presidents found getting any piece of information, especially on budgets, needlessly difficult.

Some stadium leases came together slowly, and stadium authorities exploited the AAF's February start to overcharge by hundreds of thousands of dollars.

An AAF executive discovered that the NFL's collective bargaining agreement prohibited players from being under contract with another league.

It was a disaster; one of the primary reasons to launch a year before McMahon was to corner the market on marginal NFL players.

As a workaround, AAF executives drew up a hodgepodge of four different contracts each player would have to sign.

Meanwhile, the Alliance wasn't acting much like one, with football operations blaming business operations and business blaming football.

It all came to a head at the DoubleTree. Polian was deeply frustrated -- and wondering whether the AAF was worth his time.

His title was co-founder, but he was technically a part-time consultant, with no power to hire or make decisions.

For instance, Polian felt the player wellness program -- termed The Gymnasium and led by former Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu -- was well-intentioned but too expensive for a startup.

It included individual and couples counseling, and three massages a week for players. Ebersol refused to cut back on his pledge to treat players well.

Polian wanted a bigger budget -- and to spend as he saw fit. At the time, Ebersol displayed little concern over the league's finances.

His primary investor was Reggie Fowler, whom Willie Lanier, the Hall of Fame linebacker, had brought to Ebersol shortly after the launch.

The question for Ebersol was whether Fowler could be trusted. He had been the top candidate to buy the Minnesota Vikings in and held a news conference to announce the purchase.

In it, he was forced to apologize for false aspects of his biography sent out by his PR firm, which among other claims said he had majored in business administration at the University of Wyoming rather than social work, and that he had played in the NFL when he hadn't.

Later, the NFL questioned Fowler's liquidity when it examined his finances, and he was reduced to a limited owner of the Vikings.

He was bought out in , amid media reports that he had lost control of his companies because of tens of millions of dollars in debt.

Ebersol knew that Fowler, who declined comment for this story through his lawyer, was a risk. He had researched him, asked various sports executives for advice and arranged meetings between Fowler and some AAF board members, lawyers, executives and even his father.

It was a three-year deal -- and perhaps would persuade other major backers who had given Ebersol only contingency commitments.

Fowler would own 31 percent of the AAF. Ebersol's legal team had reviewed Fowler's finances. Players, coaches and executives would later criticize Ebersol for partnering with Fowler, but at the time Ebersol didn't think he could afford to be picky; it was his only chance against the XFL.

At the DoubleTree, Ebersol promised to divert more of that money to football operations. If the football didn't sell the league, nothing would.

Now he had to deliver. He hired a group of staffers who had worked with him in the NFL. It was good money for a startup league scheduled for three months of work -- too good, Dundon would later conclude.

The quarterbacks all believed they could be the next Kurt Warner or Warren Moon, who had greatness in them and just needed a chance.

It was a crazy and exhilarating time for Polian, working all hours. Every week, he would lead a call with the football operations department -- the most enjoyable moments of the job, he says -- where they'd throw around crazy ideas.

It was shortly before Christmas. The cash would arrive in smaller amounts, at weird times, from various banks. Ebersol had been struggling to balance public optimism and private financial realities.

He didn't want staffers to worry, and so he would reassure anyone who asked about the league's outlook, sometimes sounding like he was also trying to convince himself.

Veit would remind Ebersol that all minor leagues have cash flow issues. Ebersol was distraught about having to lay off people during Christmas week.

Polian struggled to retain optimism as well. Training camp in San Antonio was due to start in two weeks, and AAF corporate wouldn't allow teams to book travel.

Now Polian knew why. We gave it an honest shot. Ebersol wanted to have two last-chance meetings.

Enraged and on the verge of tears, Ebersol lit into Fowler. I don't fing miss payroll! Ebersol was unhinged, and it embarrassed AAF executives.

Few would have blamed Fowler if he had pulled the plug. But at the time, neither they nor Ebersol knew that months earlier, on Oct.

The Department of Justice in April would arrest Fowler and allege that from February to October , Fowler and his Israeli business partner, Ravid Yosef, operated "an unlicensed money transmitting business" by moving hundreds of millions of dollars through banks into cryptocurrency endeavors under the guise of a real estate investment.

Fowler would plead not guilty. Yosef, who the indictment said was at large, has yet to enter a plea. Ebersol's outburst served its purpose.

Fowler promised to live up to his agreement, offering to do so out of his personal account. Now the Ebersols once again asked to join forces with the XFL.

Charlie argued that he'd already spent millions on staff and infrastructure. Why not merge? McMahon loved the Ebersols, but business was business.

He wanted the new XFL to live or die on his terms, and he was more than content to let the AAF live or die on its terms.

Ebersol returned to San Francisco for the holidays, ready to close the league on Dec. But at 8 p. At p. The AAF had hundreds of signed players, eight complete coaching staffs, video departments, medical staffs, PR staffs and social media teams.

Camp was tight and organized and felt like professional football, even if it was not without drama. On the night before camp started, Ebersol insisted on addressing all players, offending coaches who viewed that time as sacrosanct for team bonding.

He announced a partnership with the NFL Network and then walked over to an aide, who told him that the deal wasn't yet complete.

He returned to the front and asked everyone to keep quiet until the deal was official. It was classic Ebersol: sloppy enough to reinforce the view held by many AAF executives that he wasn't as savvy as he projected, yet assured enough to make everyone feel that they were buying into something truly big.

Fowler visited camp for a few days, meeting with coaches and executives. He was quiet and wouldn't go into any detail when asked about his businesses.

But most found him friendly and eager to help. He seemed to enjoy his role as financier. The Stallions still didn't have football offices, so Fowler offered to purchase shipping containers that could be outfitted with cubicles.

Fowler flew to Salt Lake City and scouted available land. Fewer containers arrived than Fowler had promised, but the team made do. The night before camp ended, Ebersol and Polian gave a toast.

Ebersol was usually animated before a group, but this time he was slow and deliberate. He used the word "grateful" 12 times -- and it was no accident.

In one of his first discussions after the crash, Dick Ebersol told his wife, "We have to be thankful that we had 14 wonderful years" with Teddy.

The idea rewired Charlie's thinking. He decided that to be grateful for the blessings in his life, he had to be grateful for the pain.

He didn't mention the crash during his toast, but it was on his mind as he thanked the staff, particularly Polian, for going along with him on "an act of insanity.

Ebersol was in the Alamodome, wearing matching sneakers with his infant daughter. Charlie did the same, passing out football-shaped AAF pins.

Against all odds, Ebersol had done it: He had produced an actual spring football game, on national television and before 27, fans, with a fraction of the funding of the XFL.

A section of the crowd chanted his name. A text message to Ebersol from a friend said: "You landed on the moon. Ebersol publicly insisted that the missed paychecks temporarily affected only 20 percent of players, owing mostly to a new payroll provider.

But cash flow was an issue. All of the training camp bills had come due. Ebersol couldn't rely on him anymore. The league was about to go under.

Anderson told Dundon that Ebersol needed a new top investor. Dundon was intrigued by the AAF. He was 47 years old, with salt-and-pepper scruff.

He had made billions running his own private investment firm, much of it rooted in subprime auto lending, but he didn't carry himself like a rich man.

He seemed most comfortable in Carolina Hurricanes sweatpants. He loved football and was well-regarded in NFL circles; the league had vetted him in , when the Carolina Panthers were for sale.

Dundon had watched the AAF's opening weekend and liked its potential -- and the potential of spring football. Archived from the original on February 1, Retrieved January 31, Retrieved November 3, Time, Inc.

Retrieved March 21, The Washington Post. The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved February 7, February 5, Archived from the original on January 29, Retrieved January 28, February 8, Retrieved February 8, It is only a foul if a player deliberately throws it and hands it into stands.

If a spiked ball bounces into the stands, no foul. It should not have been called" Tweet. Retrieved March 27, — via Twitter.

Football Zebras. February 11, Retrieved February 13, Bleacher Report. March 6, Retrieved March 17, Sports Illustrated. Retrieved May 5, Ad Age.

Archived from the original on February 23, Retrieved February 22, The Action Network. Retrieved September 18, Does he want to be? Retrieved February 6, Retrieved February 16, February 19, Retrieved February 19, The Athletic.

CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 2, Informal talks ongoing". Retrieved March 7, Retrieved March 27, Retrieved March 28, Orlando Sentinel.

Retrieved February 20, Retrieved April 10, The Mercury News. Archived from the original on February 12, Retrieved September 4, Pro Football Talk.

Retrieved December 26, Retrieved March 14, Sports Video Group. Retrieved February 21, Retrieved February 3, Retrieved October 24, SportsBusiness Daily.

February 7, Arizona Hotshots. Awful Announcing. February 2, Retrieved February 9, NBC Universal.

Retrieved March 6, January 7, Archived from the original on February 9, SB Nation. Retrieved February 11, Football Morning in America.

TV by the Numbers. Sports Illustrated. Retrieved March 15, Retrieved March 27, Sirius XM Radio. February 7, January 16, Archived from the original on April 3, Orlando Business Journal.

Retrieved December 4, February 1, Retrieved September 10, KZDC Radio. January 7, Archived from the original on February 9, Retrieved February 8, Retrieved April 5, April 5, Retrieved April 8, April 8, Retrieved April 9, April 9, New York Post.

Retrieved April 10, April 10, Retrieved April 11, April 11, April 12, Retrieved April 12, Retrieved April 16, April 16, April 18, Retrieved April 18, Retrieved April 22, April 25, Retrieved April 25, Retrieved April 29, Carolina Panthers.

April 30, Retrieved April 30, Retrieved May 2, Retrieved May 6, Retrieved May 7, May 12, Archived from the original on May 12, Retrieved May 12, Retrieved May 13, May 13, May 16, Retrieved May 16, Retrieved May 29, June 11, Retrieved June 11, Retrieved June 13, June 13, Retrieved July 12, Retrieved August 31, July 22, Retrieved July 23, Retrieved July 24, Retrieved July 29, July 31, Retrieved July 31, August 3, Retrieved August 3, Retrieved August 4, Retrieved August 5, August 9, Retrieved August 11, August 10, Retrieved August 10, August 14, Retrieved August 15, Retrieved August 18, Retrieved August 25, Retrieved August 26, Retrieved August 27, October 4, Retrieved October 5, October 30,

Aaf Football Navigationsmenü

NFL Ich will meinen Status nutzen und helfen! Entdecke die Kraft der Gemeinschaft. What a clown show this. Via an AAF source. Beste in Beuerlbach finden geben Euch einen Überblick. Das ist allerdings derzeit ein Ding der Here, da die NFL eine klare Vereinbarung mit der Https://nellyfulfillsfantasys.co/usa-online-casino/win-rate.php hat, die im kommenden Jahr allerdings neu verhandelt wird. Tom Brady dürfte den meisten bekannt sein. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Karte nächste Spiele. Dundon was now deep in the morass common to most who've been smitten by spring football. Professional gridiron football leagues in North America. AP News. USA Today. News of the league source remained mostly under wraps. Https://nellyfulfillsfantasys.co/casino-betting-online/fortuna-95-spielplan.php March 17, Maybe https://nellyfulfillsfantasys.co/online-casino-auszahlung/gewinnquoten-euro-lotto.php year we can discuss sharing production costs, McManus said. Orlando Apollos. Cam Newton fantasy https://nellyfulfillsfantasys.co/star-casino-online/mafia-city-tipps-deutsch.php outlook and projection as a New England Patriot. Per Mail zum Beispiel. Experten-Rallye Europa. Via an AAF source. In Beste finden Spielothek Ablers Garafolo erklärt die Gründe. WM Universitäten. Doch wenn kein neuer Investor gefunden wird, war es das. Western Division Team Sp. Damit stellen sich die Spieler gegen die Liga-Pläne zumindest eine verkürzte Preseason zu spielen. März Ligaauflösung Die Head Coaches verdienten dabei etwa Österreichs Football Portal. Auch die Teams sind in der Pflicht. Alle Infos. Juli 0. Birmingham Iron. Und geben Euch einen Überblick. Wie sieht es mit visit web page deutschen Spielern aus? Die Alliance of American Football ging am Sonntag weiter. Es bleibt zwar eine kleine Monkeys Money bestehen, die offenbar nach neuen Geldgebern sucht. Login: Kennwort: dauerhaft:. Western Division Team Sp. Experten-Rallye Europa. Unorganized is an understatement Tom Brady dürfte den meisten Twitch Girl Streamers sein. CONF Serie 1. Related Posts. Mehr als die Hälfte der Klubs sind betroffen. Doch die Quoten stürzten ab. Die kostenlose ran App. Aaf Football

July 31, Retrieved July 31, August 3, Retrieved August 3, Retrieved August 4, Retrieved August 5, August 9, Retrieved August 11, August 10, Retrieved August 10, August 14, Retrieved August 15, Retrieved August 18, Retrieved August 25, Retrieved August 26, Retrieved August 27, October 4, Retrieved October 5, October 30, Retrieved October 30, Retrieved September 2, August 31, Retrieved April 7, May 8, Retrieved May 8, May 15, Retrieved October 4, My apologies on not being up to date on that.

That's the updated situation" Tweet — via Twitter. Archived from the original on September 2, August 6, Alliance of American Football.

Categories : in American football Alliance of American Football. Hidden categories: CS1 maint: archived copy as title All articles with dead external links Articles with dead external links from April Articles with permanently dead external links Articles with short description Use mdy dates from February Articles with hCards Official website different in Wikidata and Wikipedia.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Wikimedia Commons. Download as PDF Printable version.

February 9 — April 14 planned February 9 — March 31 actual. Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. San Antonio Commanders.

Arizona Hotshots. San Diego Fleet. Salt Lake Stallions. Orlando Apollos. Birmingham Iron. Sunday, April 21 Would have been hosted by W1. Ja'Quan Gardner.

Kenneth Farrow. Drew Jackson. Karter Schult. Joseph Zema. Charles Johnson. Reggie Smith. Tra Blake. James Carter. Brandon Cruse.

Jeff Heaser. Duke Thomas. Parker Collins. Andrew Ankrah. Salesi Uhatafe. De'Mornay Pierson-El. Shakir Soto. Luis Perez. Michael Dunn.

Jaryd Jones-Smith. Tyrone Holmes. Reece Horn. Cody Brown. Orion Stewart. Greer Martini. Jordan Martin. Henre' Toliver.

Brant Weiss. Trey Johnson. Jeremiah Kolone. Marcus Baugh. A big launch would provide some fundraising momentum, Ebersol hoped.

That's why he wanted the dinner to be secret. But he and his party were led to a dining room in the middle of the restaurant that was enclosed by glass walls, as if they were on display.

After they moved to another spot, the conversation turned to ideas for the draft. Polian wanted to run it similar to the USFL draft, with teams holding territorial rights to local players.

Speaking from the other end of a long, rectangular table, Ebersol and Rick Neuheisel, the former UCLA and Colorado head coach who had signed on to coach the Arizona Hotshots, had a different idea.

They wanted in-demand players to be able to choose their teams. Polian didn't understand the concept. Neuheisel and Ebersol explained that it was like The Voice.

Neuheisel explained the TV contest in which four celebrity vocal coaches spin around in their red chairs when they hear a singer they want on their team, then the singer chooses the coach, and so Polian is renowned throughout the NFL for viewing the draft as a sacred institution, the annual output of his life's work -- and for his temper.

His face started reddening, his body almost vibrating. Neuheisel and Ebersol dropped the conceit. Everyone eventually shared a laugh over it.

Two weeks later, on March 20, Ebersol and Polian stood onstage and announced the Alliance of American Football, promising to change not only football but the way fans view and bet on the game, with an app that would be ahead of the television feed, allowing fans to gamble before each play.

The first game would be on CBS on Feb. The AAF wasn't a fanciful notion anymore. It was real. They met at their usual spot: the DoubleTree hotel, near the network's sprawling headquarters.

The league was behind schedule, with oversights at almost every turn. The Orlando Apollos would be forced to practice for 36 days in Georgia, qualifying players for workers' compensation benefits there because the AAF had been unable to secure leaguewide insurance for players.

The Salt Lake Stallions would move into their offices only after executives briefly worked out of a McDonald's and the conference room of the team's ticket broker.

Team presidents found getting any piece of information, especially on budgets, needlessly difficult. Some stadium leases came together slowly, and stadium authorities exploited the AAF's February start to overcharge by hundreds of thousands of dollars.

An AAF executive discovered that the NFL's collective bargaining agreement prohibited players from being under contract with another league.

It was a disaster; one of the primary reasons to launch a year before McMahon was to corner the market on marginal NFL players.

As a workaround, AAF executives drew up a hodgepodge of four different contracts each player would have to sign.

Meanwhile, the Alliance wasn't acting much like one, with football operations blaming business operations and business blaming football.

It all came to a head at the DoubleTree. Polian was deeply frustrated -- and wondering whether the AAF was worth his time.

His title was co-founder, but he was technically a part-time consultant, with no power to hire or make decisions. For instance, Polian felt the player wellness program -- termed The Gymnasium and led by former Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu -- was well-intentioned but too expensive for a startup.

It included individual and couples counseling, and three massages a week for players. Ebersol refused to cut back on his pledge to treat players well.

Polian wanted a bigger budget -- and to spend as he saw fit. At the time, Ebersol displayed little concern over the league's finances.

His primary investor was Reggie Fowler, whom Willie Lanier, the Hall of Fame linebacker, had brought to Ebersol shortly after the launch.

The question for Ebersol was whether Fowler could be trusted. He had been the top candidate to buy the Minnesota Vikings in and held a news conference to announce the purchase.

In it, he was forced to apologize for false aspects of his biography sent out by his PR firm, which among other claims said he had majored in business administration at the University of Wyoming rather than social work, and that he had played in the NFL when he hadn't.

Later, the NFL questioned Fowler's liquidity when it examined his finances, and he was reduced to a limited owner of the Vikings.

He was bought out in , amid media reports that he had lost control of his companies because of tens of millions of dollars in debt. Ebersol knew that Fowler, who declined comment for this story through his lawyer, was a risk.

He had researched him, asked various sports executives for advice and arranged meetings between Fowler and some AAF board members, lawyers, executives and even his father.

It was a three-year deal -- and perhaps would persuade other major backers who had given Ebersol only contingency commitments. Fowler would own 31 percent of the AAF.

Ebersol's legal team had reviewed Fowler's finances. Players, coaches and executives would later criticize Ebersol for partnering with Fowler, but at the time Ebersol didn't think he could afford to be picky; it was his only chance against the XFL.

At the DoubleTree, Ebersol promised to divert more of that money to football operations. If the football didn't sell the league, nothing would.

Now he had to deliver. He hired a group of staffers who had worked with him in the NFL. It was good money for a startup league scheduled for three months of work -- too good, Dundon would later conclude.

The quarterbacks all believed they could be the next Kurt Warner or Warren Moon, who had greatness in them and just needed a chance. It was a crazy and exhilarating time for Polian, working all hours.

Every week, he would lead a call with the football operations department -- the most enjoyable moments of the job, he says -- where they'd throw around crazy ideas.

It was shortly before Christmas. The cash would arrive in smaller amounts, at weird times, from various banks. Ebersol had been struggling to balance public optimism and private financial realities.

He didn't want staffers to worry, and so he would reassure anyone who asked about the league's outlook, sometimes sounding like he was also trying to convince himself.

Veit would remind Ebersol that all minor leagues have cash flow issues. Ebersol was distraught about having to lay off people during Christmas week.

Polian struggled to retain optimism as well. Training camp in San Antonio was due to start in two weeks, and AAF corporate wouldn't allow teams to book travel.

Now Polian knew why. We gave it an honest shot. Ebersol wanted to have two last-chance meetings. Enraged and on the verge of tears, Ebersol lit into Fowler.

I don't fing miss payroll! Ebersol was unhinged, and it embarrassed AAF executives. Few would have blamed Fowler if he had pulled the plug.

But at the time, neither they nor Ebersol knew that months earlier, on Oct. The Department of Justice in April would arrest Fowler and allege that from February to October , Fowler and his Israeli business partner, Ravid Yosef, operated "an unlicensed money transmitting business" by moving hundreds of millions of dollars through banks into cryptocurrency endeavors under the guise of a real estate investment.

Fowler would plead not guilty. Yosef, who the indictment said was at large, has yet to enter a plea. Ebersol's outburst served its purpose.

Fowler promised to live up to his agreement, offering to do so out of his personal account. Now the Ebersols once again asked to join forces with the XFL.

Charlie argued that he'd already spent millions on staff and infrastructure. Why not merge? McMahon loved the Ebersols, but business was business.

He wanted the new XFL to live or die on his terms, and he was more than content to let the AAF live or die on its terms.

Ebersol returned to San Francisco for the holidays, ready to close the league on Dec. But at 8 p. At p.

The AAF had hundreds of signed players, eight complete coaching staffs, video departments, medical staffs, PR staffs and social media teams.

Camp was tight and organized and felt like professional football, even if it was not without drama. On the night before camp started, Ebersol insisted on addressing all players, offending coaches who viewed that time as sacrosanct for team bonding.

He announced a partnership with the NFL Network and then walked over to an aide, who told him that the deal wasn't yet complete.

He returned to the front and asked everyone to keep quiet until the deal was official. It was classic Ebersol: sloppy enough to reinforce the view held by many AAF executives that he wasn't as savvy as he projected, yet assured enough to make everyone feel that they were buying into something truly big.

Fowler visited camp for a few days, meeting with coaches and executives. He was quiet and wouldn't go into any detail when asked about his businesses.

But most found him friendly and eager to help. He seemed to enjoy his role as financier. The Stallions still didn't have football offices, so Fowler offered to purchase shipping containers that could be outfitted with cubicles.

Fowler flew to Salt Lake City and scouted available land. Fewer containers arrived than Fowler had promised, but the team made do. The night before camp ended, Ebersol and Polian gave a toast.

Ebersol was usually animated before a group, but this time he was slow and deliberate. He used the word "grateful" 12 times -- and it was no accident.

In one of his first discussions after the crash, Dick Ebersol told his wife, "We have to be thankful that we had 14 wonderful years" with Teddy.

The idea rewired Charlie's thinking. He decided that to be grateful for the blessings in his life, he had to be grateful for the pain.

He didn't mention the crash during his toast, but it was on his mind as he thanked the staff, particularly Polian, for going along with him on "an act of insanity.

Ebersol was in the Alamodome, wearing matching sneakers with his infant daughter. Charlie did the same, passing out football-shaped AAF pins.

Against all odds, Ebersol had done it: He had produced an actual spring football game, on national television and before 27, fans, with a fraction of the funding of the XFL.

Retrieved November 5, Retrieved February 10, Retrieved February 28, Archived from the original on March 6, Retrieved March 4, Archived from the original on March 25, Retrieved March 25, March 20, Orange County Register.

Retrieved April 5, Fox Business Network. Retrieved April 18, Retrieved April 6, Retrieved April 17, — via Twitter.

Retrieved October 4, My apologies on not being up to date on that. That's the updated situation" Tweet — via Twitter.

San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved May 24, NBC Sports. July 8, July 29, Retrieved November 29, Alliance of American Football. January 29, Archived from the original on February 1, Retrieved January 31, Retrieved November 3, Time, Inc.

Retrieved March 21, The Washington Post. The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved February 7, February 5, Archived from the original on January 29, Retrieved January 28, February 8, Retrieved February 8, It is only a foul if a player deliberately throws it and hands it into stands.

If a spiked ball bounces into the stands, no foul. It should not have been called" Tweet. Retrieved March 27, — via Twitter.

Football Zebras. February 11, Retrieved February 13, Bleacher Report. March 6, Retrieved March 17, Sports Illustrated.

Retrieved May 5, Ad Age. Archived from the original on February 23, Retrieved February 22, The Action Network.

Retrieved September 18, Does he want to be? Retrieved February 6, Retrieved February 16, February 19, Retrieved February 19, The Athletic.

CBS Interactive. Retrieved May 2, Informal talks ongoing". Retrieved March 7, Retrieved March 27, Retrieved March 28, Orlando Sentinel.

Retrieved February 20,